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Stem

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No need to prune and repot every houseplant every year. Many grow very slowly, so might need this treatment only every few years.

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Pruning the stems of a houseplant is just the first step. After a few years, depending on how fast a plant grows, roots will fill a pot until they have no room left to grow. Roots attempting to escape out the drainage hole of a pot is one indication of overcrowding.

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The most obvious reason to prune a houseplant's stems is to keep the plant manageable. For example, growing in the ground in a tropical climate, branches of weeping fig, a familiar houseplant, will reach skyward and spread as high and wide as a sugar maple's. Indoors, at the very least, your ceilings limit the desired height of a houseplant. For looks, you might want to keep the plant smaller, perhaps much, much smaller.

A longtime bohemian standard during the 1970s, hanging houseplants have returned in a big way as demand for plants has skyrocketed in the pandemic and Instagram influencers create indoor jungles. Plant parents love to dote on their houseplants, especially now that everyone is hunkering down at home, but are all indoor plants well suited to hanging?

Thanks to the efforts of the local Forestry and Cooperative Extension Agents, Lee M. Waid Elementary School is proudly taking part in the 2020…